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‘Though He Slay Me, I Will Trust In Him’

Question: "How could Job say, ‘Though He slay me, I will trust in Him’?"

Answer: In Iyov (Job) 13:15, Job declares, “Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him.”

This faith-filled statement has challenged countless believers through the centuries to strive for a similar trust in YAHUAH in the face of trials.

Job made this statement when he was in a terrible time of pain and suffering. He had lost all of his children, his wealth, and his health. His friends were of no help. His wife offered no support and was in fact telling him to give up (Job 2:9). Job felt as though his life was over. The only thing left was to die. But, as Job says, even if YAHUAH did “slay” him, Job would still trust in Him.

Of note here is the fact that Job realizes that, ultimately, the suffering he endures is allowed by YAHUAH. It is YAHUAH who has the right and the power to “slay” Job. Even in the midst of his pain, Job knows that “YAHUAH brings death and makes alive; / he brings down to the grave and raises up” (1 Samuel 2:6). YAHUAH alone holds the “keys of death” (Revelation 1:18).

The faith of Job is seen in the fact that even if YAHUAH’s plan results in Job’s death, Job will continue to trust in YAHUAH. Nothing can shake the faith of someone so grounded in the goodness and glory of YAH. Job may not understand what is happening to him and why, but he knows that YAHUAH is good, loving, and trustworthy.

In the following verse, Job adds, “Indeed, this will turn out for my deliverance, / for no unrighteous person would dare come before him!” (Job 13:16). The idea seems to be that, if Job dies, he will be with YAHUAH (this refers to Job’s death). At the same time, Job maintains his innocence: he is not a “unrighteous person” and will therefore be admitted to YAHUAH’s presence.

Job realizes his pain was not permanent. With YAHUAH, there is a way of escape. The suffering of this life is temporary and will end for those who trust in YAHUAH. After this life, there is eternal life with YAHUAH in the Kingdom for the believer. In fact, YAHUSHA came to offer eternal life to all who would believe (John 3:16). By YAHUAH’s grace. (Ephesians 2:8–9).

Job appears to also challenge YAHUAH at the risk of his own life. In other words, Job is willing to go before YAHUAH with his case even if he dies in the process. Job’s statement that he is innocent in Job 13:16 becomes more insistent throughout the rest of the book. The final chapter of Job shows the results of Job’s pleading. Job oversteps what was right in saying he was without sin. As a result, Job ends his conversation with YAHUAH differently, stating, “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, / things too wonderful for me to know” (Job 42:3). He concludes, “I despise myself / and repent in dust and ashes” (Job 42:6).

The apostle Paul echoes Job’s statement of faith in Philippians 1:20, “I eagerly expect and hope that I will in no way be ashamed, but will have sufficient courage so that now as always Messiah will be exalted in my body, whether by life or by death.” When we suffer and do not understand why, we can trust that YAHUAH has a greater plan in place that we cannot see. Instead of seeking to defend ourselves before YAHUAH, Job’s experience shows us we can instead trust YAHUAH. He has a perfect plan in place, and “by life or by death,” may YAHUSHA HA’MASHIACH be exalted.

‘Though He Slay Me, I Will Trust In Him’

https://truthersjournal.com/20....23/06/12/though-he-s

‘Though He Slay Me, I Will Trust In Him’ – Truthers Journal
truthersjournal.com

‘Though He Slay Me, I Will Trust In Him’ – Truthers Journal

‘Though He Slay Me, I Will Trust In Him’ Question: "How could Job say, ‘Though He slay me, I will trust in Him’?" Answer: In Iyov (Job) 13:15, Job declares, “Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him.”  This faith-filled statement has chal

What Is A Covenant?

Generally speaking, a covenant is a promise between two or more parties to perform certain actions. The word can also be used as a verb as in “We covenant to work together on this project until it is finished.” A covenant is very similar to a promise.

The concept of covenant is significant in the Scriptures. In fact, the word testament is really another word for covenant. The Scriptures is comprised of two parts, the Old Covenant and the Renewed Covenant (Old Testament and New Testament). Covenant was a well-known concept in ancient times, and covenants could be made between two equal parties or between a king and a subject. The king would promise certain protections, and the subject would promise loyalty to the king. A covenant might be conditional or unconditional.

The Old Testament is more than a history of Yisrael. It is really a history of the covenant in which Yahuah revealed, little by little, His character and His plans and purposes for mankind. Most Bible scholars recognize several major covenants in the Old Testament in which Yahuah promises to do something.

After the flood, Yahuah made a covenant with Noah that He would never again destroy the world by a flood, and He also gave some basic principles for humanity to live by (Genesis 8:20—9:17). Although humanity soon descended into rampant disobedience once again, the promise not to destroy the earth by another flood was unconditional.

Yahuah made a covenant with Abraham in which He promised, “I will make you into a great nation, and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse, and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you” (Genesis 12:1–3). This covenant was reiterated in Genesis 15 and 17. This was also an unconditional covenant.

Yahuah made a covenant with Yisrael regarding their use of the Promised Land (Exodus 19—24). The land had been given to Abraham’s descendants unconditionally; however, the use of the land by any specific generation of Yisraelites was conditional upon their obedience. As a result, at times they lived in the land but were oppressed and not able to enjoy the full benefits of it, as seen in the book of Judges. Later, the Yisraelites were exiled from the land due to their disobedience and idolatry. However, even though one generation was disobedient, Yahuah promised to bring a later generation back to the land (Isaiah 11:11–12). He kept His word, as recorded in Ezra and Nehemiah.

Yahuah made a covenant with David that he would have a descendant who would sit on his throne forever (2 Samuel 7). This was an unconditional covenant, although the length of reign for any specific Davidic ruler could be limited by his disobedience. Solomon’s son Rehoboam lost a large part of the kingdom due to his foolish choices. This covenant is ultimately fulfilled in Yahusha Ha’Mashiach, the Son of David.

In Jeremiah 31, Yahuah promised a New Covenant with Yisrael. Yisrael repeatedly violated the terms of all the previous covenants, but Yahuah promised this would be different because the hearts of the people would be changed so they would want to be faithful. This is fulfilled in the Renewed (Covenant) Testament with the coming of Messiah and the indwelling and empowering of the Ruach Ha’Kodesh, who gives the people of Yahuah the desire to obey Him. What was a surprise to some is that Gentiles were also included in this covenant.

The concept of covenant has been lost in modern society. Promises are broken when new circumstances arise. Contracts are broken, and one party simply says, “Sue me.” Marriage is supposed to be a covenant between a man and a woman for life, but divorce is commonplace today.

Regardless of how unfaithful people may be, Yahuah will never be unfaithful to His covenant promises.


What Is A Covenant?

https://truthersjournal.com/20....23/08/13/what-is-a-c

What Is A Covenant? – Truthers Journal
truthersjournal.com

What Is A Covenant? – Truthers Journal

What Is A Covenant? Generally speaking, a covenant is a promise between two or more parties to perform certain actions. The word can also be used as a verb as in “We covenant to work together on this project until it is finished.” A covenant is very

Shabbat Shalom everyone. We really needed todays rest. Hope every one is well. I must say i need to come here more often . Its so much peaceful.

Shabbat Shalom! Is there a scripture reading airing on YouTube this morning?

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Shabbat shalum
Shabbat shalum from the Martinez Homestead

SHABBAT SHALOM!!!!!!! I have missed you all so much!! The Dippong Family is about to Shabbat SO HARD today 🤣😂🤣🤣😂 I woke up SO STRESSED, but then I said WAIT ITS SHABBAT!!! HALLELUYAH!!!!
How anyone can call this amazing and beautiful day a burden is beyond me. I have never felt so loved and free in my life. Yada YAHUAH for His wisdom and mercy to create a day of rest for us!!!! Can’t wait to see you all in the chat today. Love you and we are praying for you all!!!

Shabbat Shalom!
From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same YAHUAH’s name is to be praised. TEHILLIYM (PSALMS) 113:3

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